Seven Ways to Choose the Right Neighborhood for You

If you’re starting a family, you might want to consider a neighborhood known for its good schools. Or if your children have graduated, you might want to move to a “hipper” neighborhood. Perhaps your company has moved, and you want to be closer to work. Any of your priorities may have changed over the years. Here are seven ways to evaluate a possible move.
choosing the right neighborhood

Here are seven ways to choose the right neighborhood for you and/or your family

#1: Time the Commute to Your Job

Perhaps you have been spending hours stuck in traffic to and from work and are looking for a much shorter commute. Just because one neighborhood is closer does not mean that you will get there faster. Time the commute from the different neighborhoods you are considering.

#2: Read About the Local Job Market/Main Industries

Having a job today does not guarantee that you’ll have one tomorrow. And even if you do, it’s important to know if you are moving into a neighborhood that is growing and thriving or one that is crumbling. Get a local paper and read about the main industries in the area and the state of the local job market.

#3: Go for a Walk Around the Neighborhood

One of the best ways to pick the best neighborhood is to look around it. Go for a walk and drive through the neighborhood on the weekend and on weekdays. Do the same thing at different times of day. Note where there are areas that look a little unsafe or dilapidated. How will that affect your quality of life there?

#4: Meet the Neighbors

You want to get a feel for the neighborhood? Talk to the neighbors. Just by walking around the neighborhood, you’ll get a vibe to let you know if it’s right for you. Are the people a little standoffish? Are they hesitant to make eye contact with you?

Are people friendly and neighborly? Maybe a little too friendly and neighborly…? Take a walk around and strike up a conversation with your potential future neighbors to get a good feel for the community.

#5: Go Out to Eat at a Local Hot Spot

While you’re checking out houses, go to a popular eatery in the neighborhood. Check out the vibe and take note of people’s moods. Do they look at you suspiciously? Is the customer service lousy? Is it great and are the people great? You can glean a lot about a neighborhood by simply people-watching at a diner.

#6: Attend a Local Festival or Event

Kill several birds with one stone by attending a local event or festival. You’ll meet people in the neighborhood and get a sense of the type of community that it is; is it tight-knit? Young? Too old? A little too country? Local events can tell you a lot about the spirit of the neighborhood.

#7: See a Play or a Game at a Local School

If you have kids, the quality of the local schools in your neighborhood may be priority No. 1. Before you buy a house and enroll the kids, visit the school. Go to a school play or watch one of the local school’s sports teams to get a feel for the level of community support for the school and athletics.

Organize Your Home by Feb. 1 in Less Than an Hour a Day

Follow these steps, spending less than an hour day for a better organized home by February!

1. Do That Project

“What about your space is making you feel uncomfortable or overwhelmed?”  Is it the paperwork disaster in your office? The pile of clothes teetering on your dresser? Or that mess that surrounds your doorway? Start with what’s annoying you, she says. One hour on that task will get your organizing engine revving. Let’s start with the KITCHEN!!!

2. Create a “Go Away” Box

Put anything you’re planning to donate in it (or give to a friend, or take to recycle). And keep it by the door so you can easily grab it when you’re leaving.

3. Deal With the Decorations

Hallelujah — the holidays are over! When you’re putting away your décor, donate anything you didn’t bring out last season, and separate decorations by holiday. No need to dig through your St. Patty’s clovers when you’re searching for a menorah.

4. Create a System for Your Entryway

Set up a “command center” so your front door doesn’t become a lawless accessories arena, especially during winter months. Add hooks for coats, bins for shoes, and a mail sorter if you need it. (Remember to keep a place for your “go away” box).

5. Wrangle Your Pet Supplies

Minimize the time spent scrambling when your pup is desperate for a walk or eager for a meal. Hang hooks and cubbies near the door and keep leashes, kibble, bowls, and toys in one convenient spot.

6. Organize Your Spices

Arrange your herbs and spices alphabetically, by cuisine, or by brand — whatever makes them easier to find when you’re in the middle of your noodle stir fry.

7. Pare Down Your Utensils

You’ve accumulated several dozen kitchen utensils in your culinary career: can openers, microplanes, four (what?!) wine openers. Pare down the collection and use drawer dividers to keep the remainders in order.

8. Reconfigure Your Pots and Pans

Stop digging around in your shelves for the oversized, cast-iron skillet. Donate the pots and pans you hardly use, and install cupboard organizers to help manage the rest.

9. Throw Away Expired Foods

You never use Worcestershire sauce — except that one time. Go through your refrigerator and pantry and ditch or donate anything past its prime.

10. Stack Your Pantry Staples

Make better use of your pantry by sorting through your staple dry goods — think flour, sugar, pasta, oatmeal, dry beans — and putting them in airtight, stackable containers. You’ll free up a ton of space, too.

11. Downsize Your Kitchen Gadgets

You had noble intentions when you purchased that spiralizer. (Zucchini noodles every night, right?) Give those space hogs to someone else with lofty dreams.

12. Say No to Coffee Mug Over-Saturation

Every time you lose a sock, a new coffee mug appears. Keep one or two mugs for every coffee or tea drinker, and donate the rest.

13. Sort Your Food Storage Containers

No singles allowed. Toss any tops or bottoms that have no mates.

14. Reassess Your Display Shelves

Shelves crammed with knickknacks, books you’ll never read, and stuff you somehow accumulated are just a waste of space. Donate books to the library, discard the junk, and arrange what’s left in a way that pleases you.

15. Deal With Your Cables

With a Roku, PlayStation, DVD player, and a cable box, it’s no surprise your entertainment center is a mess. Create ID tags for each plug from bread tags or cable ties, and bundle the clutter together with velcro strips.

16. Put Clothes on New Hangers

Switch your clothes over to the slimmer, grabbier hangers. They use less space and keep your clothes from sliding down to your closet floor. As you do this, discard the clothes you never wear.

17. Corral Your Accessories

Belts, scarves, purses, hats — all the accessories that don’t have a drawer or spot in the closet can end up everywhere. Buy an accessories hanger or install a simple series of hooks to give your wardrobe’s smallest members a home.

18. Purge Under the Bed

Under-bed storage is ideal for out-of-season clothing. But when out-of-season becomes out-of-sight and out-of-mind, clear out those clothes you’ll never wear again from this precious storage space.

19. Declutter Your Desk

When your workspace is swimming with collectibles, staplers, Post-its, and more, paring down can keep you focused when it’s time to hunker down.

20. Shred Old Paperwork

Not every form, statement, and tax record needs to stay in your filing cabinet forever.

Shred the rest to ward off identity thieves.

21. Tidy Your Files

Now that you’ve shredded the paperwork you don’t need, tidy up your files by organizing them and labeling them clearly. Colorful folders can help organize by theme (home stuff, tax stuff, work stuff, etc.).

22. Get Rid of Mystery Electronics

Admit it. You’ve got a drawer where black mystery cords, chargers, and oddball electronic bits go to die. Free that drawer up for better uses, or at least get rid of the ones you know for sure are “dead.”

23. Pare Down Your Personal Care Stuff

Your intentions were honorable when you bought that curl-enhancing shampoo — but it expired two years ago, and you haven’t used it since. Throw away any expired potions, salves, hair products, and medicines.

24. Tackle Under-the-Sink Storage

Clean everything out. You’ll be amazed at what you find (like those Magic Erasers you could never find). Then put back everything you’re keeping in bins you can easily pull out so nothing gets lost again.

25. Hang a Shelf

Wall storage is so often overlooked. Find a spot in your home where a shelf would solve a problem, and hang it. Maybe it’s for some toiletries in the bathroom, or laundry supplies, or for your kid’s stuffed toys.

26. Reduce Your Towels and Linens

There are the towels you use — and the stack of towels you never use. Donate them to the animal shelter. Those torn pillowcases? Convert to rags or toss. Same for napkins, dishtowels, pot holders, etc.

27. Hang a Shoe Organizer

Hanging shoe organizers can solve a ton of storage problems beyond the obvious. They can store scarves, mittens, cleaning supplies, craft supplies. You can even cut them to custom-fit inside a cabinet door.

 

28. Organize Your Junk Drawer for Good

There’s no shame in a junk drawer — but why not organize it? Dump the whole thing on one surface and sort everything into piles. Use drawer dividers to keep each pile in its own space.

29. Store Your Tools the Right Way

Finding the right Phillips-head screwdriver to put together that cute IKEA bookshelf shouldn’t be so hard. Track down your hammers and screwdrivers, and arrange them in one easy-to-access spot, such as a pegboard.

30. Plan for the Future

See how much you’ve accomplished! Take a look around your newly organized home, making note of any spaces you missed. Then dream a bit about your next home project.

Painting a room is a great way to make change without breaking the bank too!

 

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